First Steps With Brushless Servodrive (Microchip dsPIC + IRF IRAMS)

Today I got the whole motion control chain from EMC2 on the pc through the Mesa m5i20 servo-card, homemade optoisolator card (far right), PWM to analog filter (small board on the right), servodrive (middle), powerstage (middle left, with heatsink), through to the motor (left, a Sanyo P5 1kW servo) working !

This is truly Open Source cnc: EMC is obviously an OpenSource project, but also the FPGA configuration on the m5i20 is published under the GPL, and my servodrive code will be available when it fully works.

The picture might seem messy with a whole lot of wires - but I can assure you that it's all very organized... 🙂

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New Servos and Rails for CNC upgrade

Back in October-November Surpluscenter was 'giving away' brand new servos at 40usd/servo when the cost for new ones can be 1000+usd/servo ! So we just had to get these for our next cnc upgrade. Here are some 400 W Sanyo Denki P5 100VAC brushless servos. The bigger servo, third from the right is a 1 kW model. The catch is that these servos need an advanced servo amplifier/drive to operate. There are several amateur/open-source efforts which aim to produce such a drive cheaply or DIY:
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14673
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14477
and
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14556

To finance the amplifier development/purchase and the rest of the upgrade, I am selling three of the 400W servos.

Below some IKO LWL 15 rails which will also be used:

Testing VFD and AC induction motor


The stock 600 W DC motor on the CNC-converted Opti BF 20 burned out and had to be replaced.

Jari got a 750 W ABB AC induction motor to replace it and found this used VFD for driving it. Here we are testing the VFD for the first time and it seems to work OK. Acceleration and braking speed is great compared to the old DC-drive.

There's a normally-open start switch (black), a normally closed stop switch (red), an SPDT direction switch (blue), and a linear 10k pot (black) for adjusting the speed. Next step is to build a proper front panel for the switches. The VFD also has a 0-5 V load output which would be nice to monitor while machining.

I've started a new category, CNC, for everything related to CNC control and machines. Hopefully I'll have more to post about these things in the future...